epub pdf Coleridge: Early Visions, 1772-1804 Author Richard Holmes – Sisnlaw.co.uk

Coleridge: Early Visions, 1772-1804 NICE BOOK. Richard Holmes has written several of my favorite biographies and I ve read hundreds Holmes has a remarkable gift for conveying another s, particularly a writer s, experience of himself in the world he inhabited, his effort to know and fashion himself and the world, to become the writer he felt destined to become I m dazzled by the clarity of the design of his books, his selection of just the right biographical detail, the presentation of context at just the right level of detail, the clarit Richard Holmes has written several of my favorite biographies and I ve read hundreds Holmes has a remarkable gift for conveying another s, particularly a writer s, experience of himself in the world he inhabited, his effort to know and fashion himself and the world, to become the writer he felt destined to become I m dazzled by the clarity of the design of his books, his selection of just the right biographical detail, the presentation of context at just the right level of detail, the clarity, even beauty of his prose His biography of Shelly Shelly The Pursuit initiated my passion for great literary biography, and his study of Coleridge only convinces me that we live in an age of great biography and that Holmes counts among the luminaries of the age to borrow from Doris Lessing Winner of theWhitbread Prize for Book of the Year, this is the first volume of Holmes s seminal two part examination of Samuel Taylor Coleridge, one of Britain s greatest poets Coleridge Early Visions is the first part of Holmes s classic biography of Coleridge that forever transformed our view of the poet of Kubla Khan and his place in the Romantic Movement Dismissed by much recent scholarship as an opium addict, plagiarist, political apostate and mystic charlatan, Richard Holmes s Coleridge leaps out of the page as a brilliant, animated and endlessly provoking figure who invades the imagination This is an act of biographical recreation which brings back to life Coleridge s poetry and encyclopaedic thought, his creative energy and physical presence He is vivid and unexpected Holmes draws the reader into the labyrinthine complications of his subject s personality and literary power, and faces us with profound questions about the nature of creativity, the relations between sexuality and friendship, the shifting grounds of political and religious belief This book has taken me a time to read but I have enjoyed every minute Holmes brought Coleridge to life for me It is thoroughly researched and Holmes uses Coleridge s writings so well But I never lost sight of the man As Virginia Woolf wrote he seems not a man, but a swarm, a cloud, a buzz of words, darting this way and that, clustering, quivering and hanging suspended. Thoughoughly researched, engagingly written biography This is the first volume of a 2 volume work So yeah, it goes pretty deep and detailed Coleridge had so much influence beyond his writings, which is why I wanted to readabout him, and this biography does not disappoint His friends and acquaintances are a veritable Who s Who of thought leaders in Britain The author includes an extraordinarily useful list of Coleridge s Circle in the back of the volume, with mini biographies of peop Thoughoughly researched, engagingly written biography This is the first volume of a 2 volume work So yeah, it goes pretty deep and detailed Coleridge had so much influence beyond his writings, which is why I wanted to readabout him, and this biography does not disappoint His friends and acquaintances are a veritable Who s Who of thought leaders in Britain The author includes an extraordinarily useful list of Coleridge s Circle in the back of the volume, with mini biographies of people mentioned throughout the book I wishbiographies included such lists I will read the second volume soon, and am looking forward to it A wonderful biography of a poet I thought I knew Holmes scholarly and sensitive account of Coleridge s life up to its halfway point 32 covers his stormy early life, his erratic youth and his important friendships with Charles Lamb, Robert Southey, William and Dorothy Wordsworth and many others Holmes is very good on the development of Coleridge as a poet,but his insights on Coleridge as journalist, radical and political commentator were a revelation He is a sympathetic biographer with a s A wonderful biography of a poet I thought I knew Holmes scholarly and sensitive account of Coleridge s life up to its halfway point 32 covers his stormy early life, his erratic youth and his important friendships with Charles Lamb, Robert Southey, William and Dorothy Wordsworth and many others Holmes is very good on the development of Coleridge as a poet,but his insights on Coleridge as journalist, radical and political commentator were a revelation He is a sympathetic biographer with a sense of humor His love of his subject shines through, yet he isn t blind to Coleridge s many personal failings, notably his failure as a husband and his weakness for drugs I would recommend this book to anyone who has ever read a poem by Coleridge and imagined they understood it Holmes has sent me back to the poems and to the autobiographical writings which I am reading with fresh eyes Richard Holmes has a way with telling the story of a person s life You can t stop reading This was part one, I ve ordered part two to find out the exciting conclusion I suppose the bad part of biographies is they all end the same way. A great biography of a complex and endlessly fascinating man In two parts. It might have helped my enjoyment of Richard Holmes s book if I were a great lover of Coleridge s poetry Some of it I like well enough, but most poetry I don t care for as a general rule Coleridge s prose from his Biographia Literaria and his correspondence is wonderful, however, and there s plenty of that in here to satisfy The writing of letters in the 18th and 19th century was a true art form I know I should haveto say here, but I don t just now Frankly, I was exhausted by this b It might have helped my enjoyment of Richard Holmes s book if I were a great lover of Coleridge s poetry Some of it I like well enough, but most poetry I don t care for as a general rule Coleridge s prose from his Biographia Literaria and his correspondence is wonderful, however, and there s plenty of that in here to satisfy The writing of letters in the 18th and 19th century was a true art form I know I should haveto say here, but I don t just now Frankly, I was exhausted by this book I don t know that I ll get to the second volume anytime soon Holmes, as always, does a terrific job of putting you there, as they say, but this is by no means light reading and it rather confirms my fogeyish opinion that no books should be longer than 300 pages, if it can possibly be helped One day in 2001, I wandered into the used bookshop in Stratford upon Avon, England, to search for a book to read to divert me from my MA thesis I found this book and immediately clutched it While I may have been reading, watching, and writing about Shakespeare, I could easily have been doing the same for the English Romantics I hadn t really re engaged with them for a few years, but I knew that I could easily plunge into a biography of Coleridge They had obsessed me since Sopho year of h One day in 2001, I wandered into the used bookshop in Stratford upon Avon, England, to search for a book to read to divert me from my MA thesis I found this book and immediately clutched it While I may have been reading, watching, and writing about Shakespeare, I could easily have been doing the same for the English Romantics I hadn t really re engaged with them for a few years, but I knew that I could easily plunge into a biography of Coleridge They had obsessed me since Sopho year of high school.I have now read this book three times in those 17 years It turned me onto Richard Holmes, who is my favorite literary biographer of all time, but it also retrained my mind to reconsider the depths of Coleridge.Wordsworth had long held the reputation as the sole founder of Romanticism, which is a nice tidy lie perfectly cloaked in the self mystifying and individualistic mythos of Romanticism, but that s like one of the Beatles claiming they wrote all the songs Wordsworth and Coleridge worked very closely between 1797 1798 to create Lyrical Ballads, so much so that The Rime of the Ancient Mariner should actually read Story by WW and Script by STC Wordsworth had many of the plot points, but Coleridge wrote all the words When it comes to the famous definition that Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelingsrecollected in tranquility , Coleridge encapsulated that phrase for the duo even though it is always assumed it was Wordsworth It s like WW and STC are the Lennon McCartney of poetry, where they can t even remember who wrote some of the best lines sometimes And yes, there was a Yoko, but that s why you have to read the book.This working relationship encapsulates Coleridge in a nutshell great when inspired but never good at the organizing His best poetry wasor less published, and most of it early Due to his descent into harrowing opium addiction, his work was always tenuous or impossible to complete He can be a maddening, frustrating subject for biography, hence why most go for Wordsworth or a seedier story between the Shelleys and Byron, or the tragedy of Keats.Coleridge s tragedy, as Holmes points out in his Postscript, is that he lived too long Yet, ironically, he was always like a child, full of open eyed and mouthed wonder literally , looking at the world in all its tiny detail But his notebooks and letters are the great unpublished treasures of literature and reveal a man that the public never knew constantly fascinating, often frustrating, always flawed, occasionally bursting into brilliance I don t want to spoil too much, but his family life both childhood and marital were very complicated but your heart will melt when you read of his relationship with his son Hartley.Essential for all interested in the Romantics and Coleridge and Wordsworth or all at once You will find the book hard to put down, like the mystical stream Coleridge always pictured in his head Holmes reads like a travel guide, which is what he does, because his practice is to travel to all the major areas where the poet traveled It shows You feel you are there from Ottery to Bristol to Nethew Stowey to Great Hall to all of the remainder of his wanderings But you also feel like you are in his mind due to the generous use of private writing to supplement all of the research One of the treasures of my library


About the Author: Richard Holmes

Librarian Note There isthan one author in the GoodReads database with this name See this thread forinformation.Biographer Richard Holmes was born in London, England on 5 November 1945 and educated at Downside School and Churchill College, Cambridge His first book, Shelley The Pursuit, was published in 1974 and won a Somerset Maugham Award The first volume of his biography of the poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Coleridge Early Visions, was published in 1989 and won the Whitbread Book of the Year award Dr Johnson Mr Savage 1993 , an account of Johnson s undocumented friendship with the notorious poet Richard Savage, won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for biography in 1993 The second volume of his study of Coleridge, Coleridge Darker Reflections, was published in 1998 It won the Duff Cooper Prize, the Heinemann Award and was shortlisted for the first Samuel Johnson Prize awarded in 1999 Richard Holmes writes and reviews regularly for various journals and newspapers, including the New York Review of Books His most recent book, Sidetracks Explorations of a Romantic Biographer 2000 , continues the exploration of his own highly original biographical method that he first wrote about in Footsteps Adventures of a Romantic Biographer 1985 He is also editor of a new series of editions of classic English biographies that includes work by Samuel Johnson, Daniel Defoe and William Godwin His latest book, The Age of Wonder 2008 , is an examination of the life and work of the scientists of the Romantic age who laid the foundations of modern science It was shortlisted for the 2009 Samuel Johnson Prize.He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, a Fellow of the British Academy and was awarded an OBE in 1992 He was awarded an honorary Litt.D in 2000 by the University of East Anglia, where he was appointed Professor of Biographical Studies in September 2001.


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