pdf Outliers Author Malcolm Gladwell – Sisnlaw.co.uk

When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is less than meets the eye At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times Beginning with a few maverick, counter intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of consensus, but it is a consensus that has been broadened by investigation and enriched by nuance.On second look, however, I m no longer sure any of this is true What first appeared to be new insights are nothing but fami When I think about Malcolm Gladwell, the first phrase that comes to mind is less than meets the eye At first glance, his work seems thoroughly researched, even visionary at times Beginning with a few maverick, counter intuitive insights, he often ends with an affirmation of consensus, but it is a consensus that has been broadened by investigation and enriched by nuance.On second look, however, I m no longer sure any of this is true What first appeared to be new insights are nothing but familiar landmarks, previously unrecognizable because of the adoption of a deliberately mannered perspective even the once apparent breadth and nuance now seem triumphs of language over logic, the apparent inevitability of his arguments an illusion conjured by the spell of his limpid prose.Take one small example from Outliers With a flurry of Occasionally insightful, but Gladwell s science is pretty junky His reasons for success change by the page And he cherry picks examples to exactly fit the scheme under consideration Plus, he s obsessed with callbacks and summary statements that only showcase the faulty connections between ideas. I know, you don t think you have the time and there are other andimportant books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book.There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me how am I going to cope without our lunches together, mate And there is basically one way for me to I know that I ve really enjoyed a book, and that is if I keep telling people about it over and over again Well, not since Pred I know, you don t think you have the time and there are other andimportant books to read at the moment, but be warned, you do need to read this book.There are a number of ways I can tell a book will be good one of those ways is if Graham has recommended it to me how am I going to cope without our lunches together, mate And there is basically one w Didn t exactly read this book Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co pilots.But my enjoyment of the book was marred by the glaring absence of any well known female outliers By chapter four or so, I noticed it and mentioned it to Joe, and then it just kept getting worse to the point that it was comi Didn t exactly read this book Joe and I listened to it in the car on the way home from visiting family for Christmas I really enjoyed it, and was very fascinated by certain parts of it, especially the sections about the Beatles, computer programmers and Korean co pilots.But my enjoyment of the book was marred by the glaring absence of any well known female outliers By chapter four or so, I noticed it and mentioned it to Joe, and then it just kept getting worse to the point that it was comical and distracting Man after man after high achieving man was featured Any time a woman was mentioned, it seemed she was a wife or mother helping to boost a high achiever to success or, in one case toward the end of the book, a somewhat slow female math student that a male professor had videotaped trying to figure out a math prob In This Stunning New Book, Malcolm Gladwell Takes Us On An Intellectual Journey Through The World Of Outliers The Best And The Brightest, The Most Famous And The Most Successful He Asks The Question What Makes High Achievers Different His Answer Is That We Pay Too Much Attention To What Successful People Are Like, And Too Little Attention To Where They Are From That Is, Their Culture, Their Family, Their Generation, And The Idiosyncratic Experiences Of Their Upbringing Along The Way He Explains The Secrets Of Software Billionaires, What It Takes To Be A Great Soccer Player, Why Asians Are Good At Math, And What Made The Beatles The Greatest Rock Band. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here Malcolm Gladwell s new book reads like a series of cocktail party anecdotes Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or somethingis open to debate At its heart, it has two themes 1 That success depends not just on talent but opportunity, and 2 that success and failure also depend on the cultural legacies we inherit from our forebears Boiled down, here are his essential ideas OPPORTUNITY1 Luck matters Hockey players who happened to be born between January and March were disproport Malcolm Gladwell s new book reads like a series of cocktail party anecdotes Whether the book is a mere fluff piece or somethingis open to debate At its hear I can save you the trouble of reading the book smart people don t automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer That s it That s what the whole book is about Gladwell looks at case after case of this Canadian hockey players, Korean airline pilots, poor kids in the Bronx, Jewish lawyers, etc Even with all this evidence it feels like he s pulling in examples that fit his theory and I can save you the trouble of reading the book smart people don t automatically become successful, they do so because they got lucky This rule applies to everyone including the likes of Bill Gates and Robert Oppenheimer That s it That s what the whole book is about Gladwell looks at case after case of this Canadian hockey players, Korean airline pilots, poor kids in the Bronx, Jewish lawyers, etc Even with all this evidence it feels like he s pulling in examples that fit his theo Here s what I wrote earlier I have to admit to theI think and talk about the book, the less I think of it It all seems too superficial.A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many knock me over with a feather moments as Blink It starts off with a bang, as he discusses amateur hockey teams and how it was noticed that virtually all the players on an Under 18 hockey team came from the first three months of the year Turns out the age cutoff is January 1 in Canada, so the olde Here s what I wrote earlier I have to admit to theI think and talk about the book, the less I think of it It all seems too superficial.A pretty interesting book, albeit with not quite as many knock me over with a feather moments as Blink It starts off with a bang, as he discusses amateur hockey teams and how it was noticed that virtually all the players on an Under 18 hockey team came from the first three months of the year Turns out the age cutoff is January 1 in Canada, so the older players those born early in the year advanced further due to thei People are criticizing this book because it is not a journal article Well guess what we re not all sociologists I have read plenty of journal articles in my own field law I m in no position to read journal articles in fields outside my own Having a well written piece of mass market writing is just the thing I need to access this information.Another criticism of the book is that Gladwell is the master of the anecdote Well, it seems to me that ALL SOCIAL SCIENCE is in some sense anecdota People are I skimmed this book instead of reading it I didn t entirely love it.Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because they have a sense of community or the fact that Southerners reactviolently to certain situations than Northerners because they derive from a culture of honor Sounds like extrapolated horseshit to me, especially I skimmed this book instead of reading it I didn t entirely love it.Although the author makes some interesting points, I find some of the correlations he tries to draw a little silly Like the Italian community in Pennsylvania where people are healthier and live longer because they have a sense of community or the fact that Southerners reactviolently to certain situations than Northerners because they derive from a culture of honor Sounds like extrapolated horseshit to me, especially considering the sample size And when the author is making sense, I feel like he isn t telling us anything we don t already know Like the fact that success breed Outliers


About the Author: Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell is a United Kingdom born, Canadian raised journalist now based in New York City He is a former business and science writer at the Washington Post He has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996 He is best known as the author of the books The Tipping Point How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference 2000 , Blink The Power of Thinking Without Thinking 2005 , Outliers Malcolm Gladwell is a United Kingdom born, Canadian raised journalist now based in New York City He is a former business and science writer at the Washington Post He has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996 He is best known as the author of the books The Tipping Point How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference 2000 , Blink The Power of Thinking Without Thinking 2005 , Outliers The Story of Success 2008 and David and Goliath Underdogs, Misfits and the Art of Battling Giants 2013


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